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Geological > Geology of Long Island Sound
Figure 9:  5,000 Years Ago - Present
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A View of the Long Island Sound Area Today

Bedrock lies at or near the surface along much of the north shore of Long Island Sound. The irregular character of this shoreline reflects the north-south bias that the bedrock has imparted to the landscape. As sea level rose, bedrock ridges became promontories and coves and embayments developed in drowned bedrock valleys. Where these valleys were filled with the sands and gravels of the glacial deltas that had built into glacial Lake Connecticut, pocket beaches and marshes developed. The limited wave energy available in Long Island Sound has done little to reshape this resistant, bedrock controlled shoreline.

To the south, the glacial composition of the Long Island shoreline has made it more susceptible to modification by waves. The long curvilinear shoreline east of Port Jefferson is a good example of this.

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